RIOTS

POLICE COMMISSIONER NG KENA BANISH TO PUB FOR MAKING SPF MALU DURING LITTLE INDIA COI?

Looking at the graphs above, it appears that the government is certainly answerable for not planning ahead Singapore’s infrastructure support while increasing the population. It is not just police officers but other infrastructure as well like transport, housing, hospital beds etc, which are sorely lacking in view of the explosive population growth especially after 2006. It is not known if Mr Ng’s frank testimony at the Little India Riot COI earlier this year has precipitated his reassignment to “jaga” water.

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SINGAPORE IS BECOMING LAWLESS

While waiting in line at the post office, two notices caught my attention. One was a police alert while the other warned against being duped by lottery scammers and kidnap ruses. At shopping malls these days, a life size cardboard cop serves as a substitute for the real thing. Foreigners have seized the opportunity to blatantly break the law: busking, fly in and fly out criminal elements, murders, vice, strikes, thuggish conduct and even rioting in Little India.

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Convicted Little India rioter gets 30 months jail and 3 strokes of the cane

A former construction worker has been sentenced to 30 months’ jail and three strokes of the cane for rioting and setting a bus on fire in Little India last year. Ramalingam Sakthivel, 33, is the first man to have pleaded guilty and sentenced for rioting on Dec 8, last year. Sakthivel had rallied other rioters around him in Race Course Road to flip over a police vehicle. The Indian national had also repeatedly hit a Singapore Civil Defence Force ambulance with a pole. Sakthivel also tried to set a bus on fire by throwing burning items into its fuel gas inlet.

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Indian national involved in Little India riot given 15 weeks jail, first to be sentenced

A 32-year-old Indian national was sentenced to 15 weeks in jail on Monday for his role in last December's Little India riot - the first among 25 accused to be dealt with. Chinnappa Vijayaragunatha Poopathi, who was originally accused of rioting, pleaded guilty last Friday to an amended charge of continuing to be in an assembly after it had been ordered to disperse under Section 151 of the Penal Code.

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HEADLINES THAT SHOOK SINGAPORE SINCE 1955

Exactly a year earlier, 12-year-old schoolboys Keh Chin Ann and Toh Hong Huat had gone missing. Despite a huge police search, a poster campaign, a $100,000 reward from MacDonald’s and a feature on television’s Crime Watch program, nothing had emerged which would explain their disappearance.

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COMMENT: Will free yoga lessons really help foreign workers?

But this one takes the cake, methinks -- free yoga classes, as reported by Channel News Asia! Organised by the Art of Living Centre, the men are taught “relaxation and breathing techniques”, as well as given “motivational talks”. Er, isn't this just an ill-disguised way of keeping them confined to remote dormitories?Well-intentioned it may be but it's misguided to the point of being a tad insulting.

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Crime and punishment: Where is the debate?

In the wake of the recent riot in Little India, one of the observations that struck me was how relatively little public discussion we see in the mainstream media about the issues of crime and punishment. When riots rocked London in August 2011, journalists and politicians got on their soapboxes and spent the following weeks denouncing the crimes and speculating on the underlying causes, as expected, but also engaged in debates about the fairness of punishments meted out, including questioning the use of excessive police force, etc.

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Little India riot: The dog that did not bark

In the aftermath of the Little India riot, the focus and dominant narrative, unsurprisingly, have been on law and order issues.

The Government’s narrative is that the riot was a “one-off” spontaneous mayhem; the proximate cause being the inebriated state of some foreign workers reacting angrily and violently to a fatal accident involving one of their own.

Yet, the law and order narrative does not sit well with the long-standing issues in Little India, such as the easy availability of alcohol, jaywalking, littering and other public nuisances, as well as overcrowding.

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