Tag Archives: NG ENG HEN

ABOUT THE SAF VOLUNTEER CORPS

Continuous stay-in-camp training or training sessions spread over several weekends. Two weeks of basic training to pick up basic soldiering skills. A week of qualification training to prepare volunteers for their specific roles. A week of advanced training for volunteers in more demanding roles to learn about close combat training and live firing.

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SINGAPORE PRs PLAN TO SIGN UP TO FULFIL ASPIRATIONS

AFTER hanging up his army boots a decade ago, Mr Calven Bland is thirsting for another spell in the military. The New Zealand-born Singapore permanent resident (PR), who was a logistician with the New Zealand Army for 12 years before coming to Singapore in 2005, plans to sign up with the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) Volunteer Corps as a security trooper.

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FLEXI-TERM FOR SAF VOLUNTEER CORPS

If one role does not work out, the volunteers will be able to switch to another. Candidates will undergo pre-enlistment screening and face an interview panel headed by Col Tan, who is on the lookout for volunteers with the "correct motivations, mainly the desire to serve".

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20-YEAR OLD AWOLEE RAPED 13-YEAR OLD

He also pleaded guilty to three other charges of sex with a minor, which involved other girls, who were aged 13 and 14 at the time. One of the girls, who became pregnant and underwent an abortion, is still his girlfriend. The prosecution asked for the youth to be sentenced to 12 years' jail and 12 strokes of the cane but his lawyer asked for him to be sent for reformative training, which can last for between 18 months and three years.

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GUIDE TO SAF MID NUMBER PLATES

The database is a labour of love bordering on obsession that pulls together pictures and notes taken of SAF vehicles seen on public roads or during open houses/events organised by the Singapore Army, Republic of Singapore Air Force and Republic of Singapore Navy. Readers with no inkling of SAF number plates should be relatively conversant by the time you reach the end of this post.

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AIR FORCE OFFICER: WE SINGAPOREAN SOLDIERS ARE NOT WEAK!

What troubles me is if there is a presence of a larger, prevalent view in Singaporean society that we are truly physically and mentally weak to defend our country and ultimately lack the will to defend what we call Home. This post will also address what our servicemen undergo, the reasons for the 2 years of service and what servicemen think and feel towards NS. I reckon that the outpouring of emotions from certain insensitive comments stems from the lack of understanding of these by those who have not or do not need to serve.

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PAP MP INDERJIT SINGH CRITICISES SAF PROMOTION POLICIES

Joo Chiat MP Charles Chong, a diploma holder who rose through the ranks in the private sector, said that with more Singaporeans getting a tertiary education, a mindset change “should have taken place a long time ago”. Ang Mo Kio GRC MP Inderjit Singh said the Public Service’s emphasis on academic results is deeply entrenched. He cited the example of the uniformed services, pointing out that he had seen many good commanders who were replaced by returning scholars. “I’ve seen scholars who are poor ground commanders and yet they get promoted,” he said.

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PHOTO ESSAY: SINGAPORE’S ELITE COMBAT DIVERS

The Navy’s combat divers, like the commandos, are among the Singapore Armed Forces’ toughest servicemen. Only the fittest are picked for a chance at this elite military vocation, and not everyone survives the rigorous training regime that pushes their physical and mental endurance to the limit. Photojournalists Alphonsus Chern and Caroline Chia tracked a batch of trainees through their six-month journey to become combat divers, watched as many dropped out along the way and had a ringside view of the toughest five days of every trainee’s life, Hell Week.

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TAN KIN LIAN: PETITION TO REDUCE NATIONAL SERVICE TO 1-YEAR

Our defense budget is high as a proportion of GDP in relation to other countries. We also require our male citizens to spend two years full time for military training and to be called back for reservist training over a period of up to 15 years. Two years is too long. In many countries that have conscription, they are able to achieve their training within 12 months.

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