Tag Archives: Ho Kwon Ping

FORMER DISSIDENT TURNED LKY FANBOY BEARS NO GRUDGES

In a lengthy interview with the media, former dissident turned local tycoon Ho Kwon Ping, founder of the luxurious hotel chain Banyan Tree Hotels & Resorts, raised plenty of eyebrows when he sang praises about the Singapore government and the late Lee Kuan Yew.

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READER CONTRIBUTION: HO KWON PING GIVING UP ON LEFTIST IDEALS?

Dear Editor, I attended Ho Kwon Ping's inaugural IPS lecture, where Ho spoke of the future of Singapore, the PAP and the ISA. Ho was a former detainee under the ISA in 1977 who succeeded in life despite his detention. Surely he would have some enlightening advice for aspiring human rights activists in Singapore. I was wrong.

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PAP WILL LOSE WITHIN THE NEXT 50 YEARS, EX-DETAINEE

"So long as the very popular current Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong remains in control - not only as Prime Minister but as Senior Minister or Minister Mentor like his predecessors, the mantle of legitimacy can perhaps be extended to younger leaders. But even Mr Lee will be in his 80s by three more elections. The challenge will be considerable from then onwards... Historical trends elsewhere point towards an election loss by the PAP in the second half of the next 50 years. Or to put it another way, it would be extraordinary if that did not happen."

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CURRENT CHECKS ON ISA ARE INSUFFICIENT, SAYS EX-POLITICAL DETAINEE

Businessman Ho Kwon Ping has called for limits to Singapore's Internal Security Act (ISA), under which people can be detained without trial if they are deemed to pose a threat to national security. The one-time political detainee also called for the phasing out of caning and capital punishment, and the introduction of National Service for new male citizens and Singaporean women.

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HO KWON PING: THE NEXT 50 YEARS IN SINGAPORE POLITICS

Singapore achieved its enviable, probably unrivalled record of incorruptibility largely because Mr Lee Kuan Yew set a tone of governance which equated to an almost ascetic personal lifestyle. If future political leaders become blase about corruption, accepting it perhaps as part of the general cynicism of the New Normal, and value their occupation as similar to that of the well-paid investment bankers against whom their pay is benchmarked, rather than as an almost-sacred mission, then Singapore indeed will no longer be exceptional.

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