civil service

GE2020: WP Png Eng Huat Exposes The Civil Service For Addressing Unelected PAP Loser As MP Of Hougang

Hougang residents have received letters and replies from Ministry of Education and Ministry of Social And Family Development, which say that the losing and unelected PAP candidate Lee Hong Chuan is the MP of Hougang SMC. This is another insidious way in which the PAP tries to hold on to power.

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GE2020: Is the PAP Having Difficulty Recruiting Candidates From The Private Sector?

So far, the 154 media has publicly announced a few potential PAP candidates for the upcoming general elections and they have been all from public sector. More names should be announced soon as the elections looms near, but it will not be a surprise if the rest will also be from the public sector.

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GE2020: Another Paper General Expected to be Parachuted into PAP

Just how many paper generals does the PAP need? Since Pinky's own entry into politics as a Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) scholar, the pattern of ownself select ownself has gone on and on and the number of paper generals in the party has been increasing. The latest addition to the "mix" is expected to be the country's first woman general (but not first woman paper general) Gan Siow Huang.

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PAP Says Public Trust Is Important, But Is It Already Eroded?

PAP Says Public Trust Is Important, But Is It Already Eroded?

Consider this. Each year, the AGO report finds multiple lapses across ministries they audit. Alarming, recurring lapses were found in many ministries. These issues identified will either compromise the governance of these organisations or involved questions on how millions of taxpayers money are spent. But, was anything other than hand slapping done by the government? Was there any decisive action taken, such as the one where Parliament unanimously voted for the WP MPs to be recused from AHTC's financial decision making?

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NOT DEMOCRATIC TO PARACHUTE EX-MILITARY CHIEFS TO HEAD OUR CIVIL SERVICE

Do you think Singapore is really becoming more junta-like? Especially with the recent appointment of ex-military chiefs to head our civil service. "Actually nothing would work becos the Govt wants the best of both worlds - to be totalitarian and still appear democratic". Do you agree?

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RETIREMENT AGE, BUT CIVIL SERVICE STILL REHIRING. OLD ALSO CANNOT RETIRE

New figures released yesterday showed that rehired workers, those that are over 62 years of age, have increased steadily. And about 1,300 civil servants who retired at age 62 last year was rehired again. The Civil Service has also hired some 2,900 public officers aged 65 and above.

While this is painted as a good news, as it shows that civil service are not adverse to hiring older and experienced workers, this can also be quite a negative look. In the first place, why are people in their retirement age need to actually go back to work? Aren't they supposed to enjoy all those hard years of work when they were younger, and use this retirement age to spend more time with their family, or put their feet up and not think about work?

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HR OF CIVIL SERVICE ONLY WANTS NUS AND NTU GRADS?

I am writing to voice my displeasure over some civil service HR department to what I feel is a very discriminatory practice. This is about the hiring of fresh graduates. I notice that the HR of civil service are only really open to graduates that comes from the NUS and NTU.

I know that NUS and NTU are the crown jewel of the Singapore education system. But, for those students who did not make it to the top two local universities, we still try hard to earn that degree through sheer hard work. It does not mean that if our degree comes from a private university, or a foreign university, or even the other local universities , we are less capable. Maybe it took us a longer and different route to reach the degree path, but we study just as hard.

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WHAT IS THE % OF NON-GRADS TO HAVE MADE IT? SURELY NOT JUST 4?

Only 4? Why not give the statistics? Instead of just citing four persons from the entire civil service – we should give the statistics as to what percentage of non-graduates have made it to senior positions. What % of non-Division I officers in Division I appointments?

As to “As of 2013, 56 per cent of the 80,000 civil servants were in Division I. About one-third were in Division II, and 7 per cent and 5 per cent in Divisions III and IV respectively” – since we are able to breakdown such statistics – surely we can give more detailed statistics in this regard. For example, what percentage of Division II, III and IV officers were able to make it to what were typically appointments filled by Division I officers? What percentage were promoted to higher appointments?

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