Tag Archives: ASPIRE

SHATTERING MYTHS ABOUT SCHOLARS, SMARTS AND RESPECT

Defenders of the scholarship system insist that if scholars fly, it is because their A-level results and the hoops they went through to win scholarships turn out to be accurate predictors of their workplace contributions; non-scholars' allegations of unfairness are just masking the fact that they are genuinely not as able. Certainly, some of the strengths that won them their scholarships, combined with the exposure and confidence imbued by a good overseas education, do translate into superior workplace performance. But it would be disingenuous to ignore systemic reasons why scholars are unfairly favoured when they start work.

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What Singapore youths ASPIRE

Recently my friend, Di, was offered to study full-time at a local university while continuing to draw part of her salary. Her employer will be paying for all her tuition fees and she will have her old job back when she graduates. Di has worked for this company for 3 years after graduating from Temasek Poly and her boss told her that she will get a chance to lead a small team 2 to 3 years after she graduates, subjected to good performance. Needless to say, knowing Di all since secondary days, she's a responsible, humble and intelligent person. She might not get straight As but she is a kind soul and most importantly, a team player with a strong sense of justice (yeah NPCC rocks haha).

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HENG: FUTURE OF EDUCATION LIES IN QUEST FOR SKILLS

That, said Education Minister Heng Swee Keat yesterday, goes to the heart of a national report to improve the career prospects of Singapore's polytechnic and technical institute's students. After two days of impassioned debate by MPs on the Applied Study in Polytechnics and Institute of Technical Education Review (Aspire) report, Mr Heng set out what he described as "limiting beliefs" that could inhibit people from achieving their full potential. The first is the mistaken belief that qualifications are all that matters. But "the highest qualifications will do a person no good, if there are no good jobs available in the first place", as shown in Taiwan and parts of Europe, he noted.

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POLY GRAD: THUMBS DOWN TO TEMASEK POLYTECHNIC

After completing 3 years of tertiary education, I graduated with a diploma in veterinary technology – and it is useless. Financing someone through vet school is no easy task, especially for those belonging to a middle income family. If you’re rich, (what the hell) just go ahead and go to vet school already. In Australia, vet school costs at least AUS$47,000 a year and the course of study is at least 5 years. As I’m a local in a country that have no universities offering a degree in vet science (or any vet-related courses for that matter), I would have to travel overseas to pursue a vet degree and thus, have the added burden of accommodation and other living expenses due to living away from my family.

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DIPLOMA AND ITE GRADUATES: ONE RACE TO THE TOP

What I’m saying is, if this country is serious about real shift in attitudes for diploma and ITE graduands, they should remove these glass ceilings and create rejuvenated energy for the climbing workers to move as high and as fast as they can! It is exciting to realise that you may have the ability to qualify for the position of a CEO or director!

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