5 REASONS WHY YOU SHOULD NOT GET A MANUAL CAR IN SINGAPORE

Some people like a manual car because it provides better control, the driver looks more sporty while driving it or it simply drives like a sports car. I totally respect that, but as a driver who has a manual car since I got my license, and as one who treats his car as merely a tool to get from point A to B, I would highly advise against getting a manual car. Here are my reasons!

Moving up a slope while stationary is an everyday event

Every qualified driver (read: a person who passes his traffic police test by following formulas) Singapore knows that there are merely two assessments on moving up a slope while stationary: one is in the circuit and the other is on the road. Sometimes, depending on the road you get, you might not even need to do it on the road. All I can say is that it is not adequate. For people holding on to an auto license, here’s the thing: when we go up a slope, we have to, based on merely “feel”, determine the weight of the car and the steep of the slope. Depending on these, we have to allocate power to the car to move off (using our clutch and accelerator). Should we not have enough power, the car will either roll back or the engine stalls.

And at an unfamiliar place with a new load (or your girlfriend / wife has put on weight), you’ll have to allocate and balance the power within nanoseconds, if not you’ll roll back or rocket forward. So now, next time, when you hear an engine roaring at a slope, it’s a manual car balancing the power. Just give it one second to find the balance and it’ll move off. (Then again, maybe I’m just not skilled…after so many years)

The number of multi-storey car park is too damn high

Going up a slope is a pain in the ass—going up a steep slope with sharp bends is hell. Remember “balancing the power” mentioned previously? Well, in some car parks, you’ve got to maintain the balance for twenty seconds while navigating a few sharp bends. One lapse of concentration and you’ll either take some paint off your car or you roll back like a roller coaster. If you don’t believe this, try going up The Central shopping mall car park. I remember sweating after going all the way up (with an unfamiliar full load) and promise to park at the hotel next door instead from then on—even when it cost much more.

Traffic jam = exercising

Auto cars merely need to step on two different pedals during a jam. Let’s just say for manual cars, the driver has to use both legs, hold on to a half-clutch position for a long period and change from gear 1 to gear 2 and back to gear 1 countless times. If you see a car going slower and refusing to stop until it is very near to the car in front, it’s a manual car, for the driver doesn’t want to change back to gear 1. I’ve lost many calories on PIE and SLE.

All your limbs are used

Right leg for accelerator or brake, left leg for clutch, right hand for steering wheel and left hand for gear. You’re using every single limb; that means you can’t hold your girlfriend’s or wife’s hand as you drive. Not that it’s a big issue, but sometimes, you just need to know she’s still beside you when you’re arguing in the car, because she might have jumped off the car—and she forgot to close the door, causing the door to be hit by another vehicle. Like that insurance very hard to claim leh. You know I’m kidding, right?

Poor resale price

To be honest, I think if I offer my car to my friend for $0, he might still need to consider. If I go to a dealer, I can almost hear what he will say to me: “Bro, your car manual very hard to sell leh. Now people all get auto license cannot drive your car. I pay you $1,010 in coins, can? No fishy one, I promise.”

Check Also

Worker’s Party MP He Ting Ru Calls Out Systemic Racism in Singapore

Sengkang MP He Ting Ru said she was dismayed that many Singaporeans are living with racism. "There is no place in our society for racism, sexism or xenophobia," she wrote.