Job commitment level low among Singapore workers

SINGAPORE — Only two out of ten workers in Singapore feel that they are committed to their jobs, while over half the workers don’t think they’re valued by their bosses, a survey has found.

The survey by Kelly Services polled from close to 230,000 people in 31 countries, including more than 1,500 individuals here.

Out of these individuals, only 20 per cent said they were totally committed to their job — a progressive decline since 2010’s 38 per cent — while only 40 per cent of employees here felt valued by their employers. Both numbers are lower compared to countries in the region including Indonesia, Malaysia and China.

The numbers indicate that employee engagement, which shows how absorbed and interested people are by their jobs, is at an all-time low in Singapore, said Kelly Services’ vice president for Singapore Mark Hall.

“This has implications for workplace performance and productivity so it is critical to identify the causes. Many survey respondents raised the lack of personal career progression, a shortage of professional resources and equipment, and lack of opportunity for community service as areas where their company did not perform well,” he told TODAY. “It is also interesting to note that only just over a third of people agreed their job provides them with a sense of meaning.”

“It’s clear that more needs to be done by employers to provide an environment that will help to increase productivity and long-term retention,” Mr Hall added. “While salary and benefits are central to an employee’s priorities, advancement, strong leadership and flexibility are also important motivators.”

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